Peony and Parakeet

Intuitive Start for Art Journaling

I Love Art Museums, an art journal page with colored pencils by Peony and Parakeet. Art museum inspiration.

My latest art journal page is about one of my favorite places: art museums. On the page, I have used both organic and graphic shapes to express the interaction between art and architecture. That interaction is something I enjoy examining when handling art museum inspiration.

Inspiration

Last week I went to Kunsthalle Helsinki to see an exhibition of Erling Neby Collection. Erling Neby is a Norwegian businessman who collects concrete and geometric art.

Arne Malmedal, Untitled at Konsthalle Helsinki, Finland
Arne Malmedal, Untitled at Kunsthalle Helsinki

This kind of art makes me remember the time when I was in my 20s and very certain of what kind of art I like and what I don’t like. Simple-shaped abstract paintings were in my comfort zone back then – it was “good art” that I was excited to see and experience although I have never been able to stretch my personal style to that.

At the exhibition, the reflection of the yellow painting was especially inspiring. It made me think how art is never disconnected from its surroundings, whether physical or mental. Thus, an illustration about art museum would not need to separate artworks from the architecture but express the holistic feeling of the experience.

Techniques

I used a couple of black pens and colored pencils for creating the page.

1) Free doodling and coloring.
Making an art journal page with colored pencils by Peony and Parakeet.

2) Drawing sharp graphic shapes with the help of a ruler and a round object. Drawing graphic shapes with colored pencils, by Peony and Parakeet

Emotional Connection

When I draw, I always want to get an emotional connection with the subject. Without that, I start to worry about the result before the first stroke! When making this page, I did not think about art museums in general. Instead, I thought about tiny details that I saw and tiny moments that I remembered from my last visit in Kunsthalle Helsinki. I focused on the feeling and let my imagination work with that.

A detail of an art journal page with colored pencils by Peony and Parakeet.

Inspirational Drawing

Working from tiny details towards the big picture is something that is not easy to explain in a single blog post. To explain it shortly, it is starting with an intuition and then slowly bringing the page towards the intention. This way of working is in the main role in Inspirational Drawing.

I Love Art Museums, an art journal page with colored pencils by Peony and Parakeet.

Inspirational Drawing is built so that you can enjoy developing the three dimensions of drawing:
1) increasing your imagination
2) improving your technical skills
3) using inspirational source material.

You will learn a creative process in detail through art journaling exercises. Course videos will not only show you how to do, but I also talk about the emotions and the inspiration behind them. I will answer your questions and help you adjust the process so that it will work for you. You can start enjoying free drawing without questioning what to draw or how the process itself will take care of that!

>> Reserve your spot now! 

6 thoughts on “Intuitive Start for Art Journaling

  1. Your piece is gorgeous and it feels just like your inspiration. Seems there are lots of places to look but when looking upward I see the brilliant grandeur of the place, and a long dark hallway holding surprises at the end, and many beautiful little moments as I look at those spaces holding your feelings. This is just beautiful. I was really understanding more when you said you focused on the feelings and let your imagination work with that. So well put! Can’t wait to see how I can employ that tactic.

    1. Thank you, Mary! It is always a pleasure to read what you see in the artwork! I show and talk about the tactic of focusing emotions much more in detail in Inspirational Drawing. Actually, I think that creating art is a process whith various phases, one being that emotional part. But more of that in the newsletter …

Comments are closed.

Scroll to top