Peony and Parakeet

5 Ways to Love Yourself When Painting

Icebreaker, a watercolor painting by Paivi Eerola of Peony and Parakeet. Read her post about how to love yourself when painting.

Here’s my recent watercolor painting. It’s called Icebreaker, and can I publicly say that I love it? Love, love, love. So this week, I daringly blog about how to selfishly love yourself when painting.

This is not my typical post. I would normally post things like “11 Ways to Make Your Painting More Abstract” or “7 Reasons Why Negative Painting is the Best Technique” or “3 Tips for Getting Closer to Your Style”. But after painting Icebreaker, I kind of melted. It became more true to me than ever before that we paint because we want this special kind of acceptance – the acceptance from ourselves.

When I whole-heartedly accepted what I had created, I didn’t just receive love from myself. I saw a long row of people congratulating me. All deceased, unfortunately, but still! There was my mother, saying that she knew I could do it. There was my father, looking away so that he could hide his smile. I saw my grandfather, a creative person I never met, congratulating me generously. And my dear aunt Rauha (which means Peace in English) was waving, looking just as lively and restlessly happy as she used to be. Now, this kind of love is what I want more and also spread more!

So this post is about turning your inner critic to your best fan. It’s not easy, and it may take like a lifetime, but it’s worth trying, so let’s begin!

1) Love Rises from the Mess

As a former engineer, I feel drawn to two-state things. Zero or one, yes or no, black or white, thick or thin, geometric or organic, the list is endless. But when painting, I like to be in the grey area, especially in the beginning. After the horrifying view of blank paper, my watercolors are sighing with relief: “She sprays and splashes so she must be having a good time.” And yes, I usually am.

But this mess is not just any mess to me. It’s a sign of hope. I hope to figure out what to do with it …

Watercolor painting in progress by Paivi Eerola of Peony and Parakeet.

Let’s love this hopefulness in us! It’s a superpower that keeps us not only dreaming but creating too.

Yes, this superpower can look like a bad thing. It can keep us awake too late at night. It can make us buy too many brushes and focus on insignificant details like wallpaper when watching a movie. But our life is never boring or lonely when we get hopeful just by making a mess.

So, make a mess, accept the mess, fall in love with the mess! The more time you spend with the mess, the more likely you will figure it out.

2) Love What Is Secondary

Ideally, I would always know what to do next. Practically, I often have moments when I have no clue. Hope seems lost. I feel fake.

Watercolor painting in progress by Paivi Eerola of Peony and Parakeet. Read her post about 5 ways to love yourself when creating art.

The best cure that I have found is to seek secondary things. They can be tiny spots or pretty accidental shapes, or sometimes I only admire how wet paint glows. It’s like filtering out 95 percent of the mess and seeing a few single things that look fascinating. Lovable.

Watercolor painting in progress by Paivi Eerola of Peony and Parakeet.

I call these elements secondary because often they are just parts of the background. But by toning down the obvious and bringing up the less apparent, I can change the direction of the painting. What anyone can see is no longer my norm. I have moved on to what only I can see.

A detail of Icebreaker, a watercolor painting by Paivi Eerola of Peony and Parakeet.

There’s so much more in us than what other people can see. Some skills and characteristics may seem secondary to others, but every one of us is allowed to love and grow them whole-heartedly.

A detail of Icebreaker, a watercolor painting by Paivi Eerola of Peony and Parakeet.

The hierarchy of the outer world doesn’t exist when you are in your inner world. You are free to appreciate discoveries that look secondary to others.

3) No Words, Just Color

It’s not easy to write about love. Love feels more like a combination of changing colors than a sentence with specific words. So when painting, let’s feel the love through color. When dipping your brush first to the paint and then to paper, exhale color. Next, put your face close to the paper and look at the spot so that it fills your view. Inhale. It’s your color. No one can take it from you. Love, love, love.

A detail of Icebreaker, a watercolor painting by Paivi Eerola of Peony and Parakeet.

4) Love the Vagueness

Yes, we want to find our style, our visual voice, our true self. But our boat is moving. We are changing, our life is changing, the world is changing. Everything is unsure and insecure. That also makes everything possible.

A detail of Icebreaker, a watercolor painting by Paivi Eerola of Peony and Parakeet.

I like to build my paintings so that I leave this vagueness/possibility alive. Maybe there’s a flower, maybe not. Someone sees some triangles only, while others see a rosebud. There can be plenty of interpretations. I am vague, and everything is all right. My painting is a living organism, partly defined by the vague me, partly by the vague you.

A detail of Icebreaker, a watercolor painting by Paivi Eerola of Peony and Parakeet.

Today we might love the current painting less than tomorrow. And our art may tell a different story after a couple of years. That’s ok.

No, that’s not ok. That’s fabulous!

5) Break It!

I admire brave people. I adore Tracy Chapman singing without a band. Her voice is not faultless, and many of her stories are not relatable to me. But I feel her honesty being present right there when I am listening to her through the headphones.

But for me, it’s often the fear that’s speaking. I hear myself shouting, “NO!” and that’s when I know that the answer should be “YES.” I know I am not alone here. We are often afraid to touch the painting even if we know it lacks something. The risk is real, but worth taking.

In this painting, it would have been so much easier not to paint that dark brown around the white area. But the ice wouldn’t start breaking otherwise.

A detail of Icebreaker, a watercolor painting by Paivi Eerola of Peony and Parakeet. Read her blog post about how to love yourself while creating art.

Let’s love this creativity that wants to break what’s almost working. Let’s cherish this wild force that we have in us.

Icebreaker, a watercolor painting by Paivi Eerola of Peony and Parakeet. Read her post about how to love yourself when painting.

Let’s love who we are when we paint, and when we are surrounded by our paintings!

Paivi Eerola and her watercolor paintings.

Icebreaker and other watercolor paintings are for sale at paivieerola.com

I currently teach an online watercolor class Magical Forest with themes hope, spirituality, flow, and curiosity. You can still hop along! The class ends at the end of April, so there’s lots of time to catch up! >> Sign up here!

22 thoughts on “5 Ways to Love Yourself When Painting

  1. Paivi this post resonates with me to my very soul. You speak the truth and it is so refreshing to have it clarified in point form.
    Thankyou for helping me see the confusion in my paintings as a way forward not a block.
    Kathleen McCue x

  2. Paivi, your thoughts are so meaningful to me. We need these reminders to love ourselves, to love our work no matter what, to allow ourselves to change inside and to change as we are creating our art. And we need to remember how very blessed we are to be able to create at all. Sending love, Cathy

  3. Thank-you for sharing your journey and telling us what we need to hear. Keep being you Paivi, cuz you’re the best!

    With much appreciation.

  4. What a wonderful post, Päivi! So wise and meaningful words. Beautiful paintings.Thank you for sharing your thoughts.

  5. I love it too! Thank you for sharing such positive ways to look at life–I think maybe the way we highlight memories is a way to make our own life into such a painting of mess and jumble, and the light of memory shines down on the positive, so that sometimes only we can make sense of what has happened in the chaos of day-to-day mess… ♥

  6. Päivi, thank you for your beautiful blog post – or should I say essay! You write as beautifully as you paint. – I often imagine, that my inner self is a creative beautiful person, who loves creating and can paint easily and carefree. But when I grab my pencils and brushes and papers, my inner self turns to a critical, rigid and not so beautiful person, who only thinks that soon I will make mistakes, and that painting is too difficult, and that nobody will like my work. And then I loose my easy way of creating and start to stick on meaningless details and loose my love for painting.
    Reading your essay made me feel very warm inside, and I will certainly read it again many times when I start painting something in the future.

  7. I think this is one of your best posts, yet! You consistently amaze me with your insights into the creative process and especially in English, a second language for you! You seem to know just the right thing to enable me to take the next step, to risk more, to push myself further. Thank you, Paivi, I feel so lucky to be your student!

  8. I love the way you share your joy.. You’re infectious; dear paivi xx
    The thought of having your ancestors cheering you on is wonderful.. We are made of them: a bit of this one and part of that one.. A bit of a mess or a wonderful work of art?? I’d say AMAZING and they are all very proud and defiantly applauding All that you do xx

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Scroll to top